Guide Feminism and Voluntary Action: Eglantyne Jebb and Save the Children, 1876–1928

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Jebb, Eglantyne [WorldCat Identities]

Skip to content Skip to search. Language English View all editions Prev Next edition 4 of 5. Subjects Jebb, Eglantyne, Jebb, Eglantyne. Voluntarism -- Great Britian -- History. Child welfare workers -- Great Britain -- Biography.

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Children's rights -- Great Britain. Feminism -- Great Britain -- History. Voluntarism -- Great Britain -- History. Women social reformers -- Great Britain -- Biography.

Jebb, Eglantyne

Social reformers -- Great Britain -- Biography. Summary "Eglantyne Jebb was a teacher, social investigator and founder of the Save the Children Fund. Her "Declaration of the Rights of the Child," adopted by League of Nations, shows evolution from Charity Organization Society model to philosophy of international mutual responsibility, childrens rights and humanitarianism"--Provided by publisher. A grammar school teacher, social worker, publicist, fundraiser for several charities and co-founder of Save the Children, Jebb led a group of feminists and pacifists to collaborate on the Declaration of the Rights of the Child.

Women born late in Victoria's reign were beneficiaries of expanded educational opportunities but legal and social conventions continued to stifle the ambitions of many. Charity work represented a chance for adventure and rebellion, yet it was also thankless work that could be both physically and morally exhausting.

Feminism and Voluntary Action uses Jebb's life as a lens through which to view the role volunteering played in women's lives before and after the First World War. By moving away from the Lady Bountiful stereotype, and promising to give aid to children regardless of race or creed, Jebb created the first international child welfare charity and brought a new professional ethos to unpaid social work. Notes Formerly CIP. Includes bibliographical references and index. Also available in print. Electronic reproduction. Available via World Wide Web. Includes bibliography p.

Mahood, L. Ryfman, Philippe, La question humanitaire. Traditionally, while referring to gender, the history of humanitarian aid traditionally privileged the image of women as victims. The newest scholarship is breaking with this pattern. In a first time, research recuperates the hidden stories of women in the humanitarian, and the contributions of Linda Mahood and Tarah Brookfield mark an important step in this direction. In a second time, historians, but also political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, are willing to explore the humanitarian aid through the gender lens.

Their effort takes looking into how socially constructed practices dictated the assignment of specific roles, hierarchies, responsibilities and expectations to men and women working in the humanitarian effort, but also how structural unequal gender roles present on the field, among the beneficiaries, undermined or even completely compromised humanitarian actions.

The conclusions drawn from these studies underline the confusion surrounding the term gender, but also the lack of appropriate gender related action on the field. The researchers point out the unilateral, top down, sometimes sterile perspective humanitarians have, one that ignores the diversity of historical, geographical, cultural, political spaces, as well as local particularities that shaped, negotiated, sometimes disrupted traditional roles and gendered identities.

When talking about humanitarian aid in Europe we understand continental and transatlantic mobilization. Gender regimes in Europe were profoundly transformed by the political and societal changes brought by the two world wars, but also by the fall of communist regimes in Europe. Even so, the European map of equal rights for women remained a heterogeneous, always shifting one. We believe that these disparities have been subsequently replicated into the functioning of different national and transnational bodies, which later impacted on how humanitarian programs were adjusted or not to the specific gender relations of the recipient societies.

What are the gender regimes inside the big transnational humanitarian bodies?

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Last, but certainly not least, what is the dominant feminist narrative present in the official humanitarian discourse when talking about the necessary gender approach in all humanitarian response? In the post-colonial turmoil, the European communist feminine mass organizations conducted actions in favor of women in the Global South, an important contribution to the institutionalization of women in development WID , idea that evolved into Women and development WAD , and gender and development in the s.

How and if the humanitarian actions in Europe, after the end of the Cold War, used the experience of feminine mass organizations in projects, if not gender sensitive, at least women centered? What are the approaches that offer the proper tolls for this research? We look for contributions that analyze the assignment of specific roles, responsibilities and expectations to men and women working in the humanitarian effort.

How do men cope with the history of important philanthropist women and the common belief that childcare activities are strictly a feminine task? Second, did the large framework of actions toward children addressed, formally or not, gender particularities and risks? Third, can we talk about a significant improvement in the results of humanitarian actions towards children after the official endorsement of a gender sensitive agenda? What are the new findings concerning women contribution in the humanitarian aid for the first half of the twentieth century and how can this information integrate a larger frame of analysis for gender in humanitarian aid?


  1. Taking on the tradition : Jacques Derrida and the legacies of deconstruction!
  2. Feminism and Voluntary Action: Eglantyne Jebb and Save the Children, - [PDF Document].
  3. Feminism and Voluntary Action: Eglantyne Jebb and Save the Children, by Linda Mahood.

During the Cold War, the European countries, western democracies or communist satellites, concentrated their humanitarian actions towards the South.