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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Dec 26, P-eggy rated it it was amazing Shelves: read , reviews , reviewed , medicine-science , reviews. This book wasn't a blog but it might as well have been. It is a series of essays on different body parts, from the head down. The author concentrates on the medical, with anecdotes, always interesting, but also brings in what history, mythology, different cultures and even literature have to say about that part of the anatomy. It reminds me a little of F. That isn't to say that Gavin Francis can't write, he can, this is a really good book, but not one that will go down in literature as a classic.

Rant on disappeared books and librarians who want to make things comfortable for white folk view spoiler [WTF is going on? I added this book and read it about six weeks ago. It should still be in currently reading but has been deleted from my bookshelves. No point in writing about it in Feedback, I either just get ignored or 'we need more details please contact Support'. Contacting Support gets some cut and pasted anodyne reply as I've complained about this issue time and again.

So what is happening to these disappeared books? I believe it is librarians doing whatever it is that causes this. I don't do any Librarian stuff any more unless it affects my books or I see something really egregious. But you can't argue with the Librarians, nor will the Chief Librarian or Support help out there. I've had a long. The authors of this crap 'robotic edition' say they changed all the people into robots so that teachers wouldn't have any problem with the white boys Tom and Huckleberry and the slave Jim.

I can only presume that all these librarians and support staff are White and do not want the evils of slavery as committed by White people to be embarrassing to teachers who think like them. Mark Twain didn't think this way and this White-washing is appalling. But why would Adventures in Human Being have been deleted from my bookshelves? View all 29 comments. We take a journey with Dr. Gavin Francis who shares with us his experience as a doctor In one of my favorite books of short stories for this year- Somehow, I had it 'wired' in my thinking that a doctor working on the brain must require ten times more 'dexterous' abilities than any other type of doctor He indicated the slide on the wall: a patients brain with with an aerial array of steel rods, clamps, and wires.

We travel from the brain The chest: heart, lungs, breasts, It was fascinating to me The man not only broke his shoulder.. The care With another surgery on the way It was all a little fascinating to read. Gavin also talked about the book The Illiad Some people called him a "batterfield medic". But as I read more It was the military doctors that taught him 'hands-on' trauma surgeries. AMEN for that!! Kidneys, liver, the intestines, pelvis, childbirth Gavin Francis's humanity so very lovely This book too! View all 11 comments. Absolutely magnificent.

A stirring, stimulating read and deeply engrossing. Francis draws on a wealth of experience without coming across as bragging, and invites consideration of what the human experience is all about with sage observations of the various facets of our human anatomy, the parts that make us work and, more intriguingly, what happens when those parts don't work. It is by turns philosophical and whimsical, vacillating from profound to lighthearted with an almost poetic delivery Absolutely magnificent.

It is by turns philosophical and whimsical, vacillating from profound to lighthearted with an almost poetic delivery informed by years of clinical training. The ties between anatomy and the humanities are explored with a refined dignity that impresses and excites, beautifully showing our dual nature: body and soul intertwined. Of particular interest to me was the chapter about the shoulder and arms which shares an incredible walkthrough of The Illiad 's accuracy with regard to battlefield wounds and trauma.

View all 8 comments. Shelves: medical-eew , radio-4 , published , sciences , summer , nonfiction. Taking in health and illness, and offering insights on everything from the ribbed surface of the brain to the unique engineering of the foot. Drawing on his own experiences as a physician and writer, he blends first-hand case studies with reflections on the way the body has been imagined and portrayed over millennia.

Our faces are key to our human identity - when faces are available, we pay more attention to them than to any part of the visual world. When our ability to use our facial muscles to convey our emotions is harmed, as in Bell's palsy, it can be socially devastating. But even when a face is damaged, it's still vital to our sense of self. His arm is paralysed, and may not recover. Since Homer wrote the Iliad almost three thousand years ago, military strategists have understood the power of wounds to the brachial plexus, the network of nerves behind our collarbones.

Our 'arms' are both parts of our body, and weapons of war. Ancient cultures used the livers of sacrificed animals to predict events; Biblical kings planned wars according to what the liver foretold. Livers appear in the proverbs of eastern Europe and in the folk tales gathered by the Brothers Grimm. And when a young gardener scratches her finger on a thorn and falls into a coma, it might be her liver which saves her life.

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It's thanks to the arches of our feet that we stepped into our humanity more than two million years ago. Read by Bill Paterson View all 6 comments. Dec 16, Jay Green rated it it was ok. In the s, Picador brought out a bunch of books featuring anecdotes about the human body by the Mexican physician F. I lapped them up. Apart from the suspicious overuse of the word "guerdon," the stories were well told, interesting, educational, and sometimes a little awe-inspiring. Gavin Francis's book follows in the same tradition, but without any of the enthusiasm. These are drily recounted chapters with the necessary exhibitions of erudition but none of the wit or charm o In the s, Picador brought out a bunch of books featuring anecdotes about the human body by the Mexican physician F.

These are drily recounted chapters with the necessary exhibitions of erudition but none of the wit or charm of Gonzalez-Crussi's books. I may have picked up one or two novel facts about the human body but I don't think they'll remain with me for long, so mundane were they.

Grand Tour on Jaws of Life

Gonzalez-Crussi, by contrast, even made the rectum sound majestic. Jul 10, David rated it really liked it Shelves: memoirs , medicine. Gavin Francis is a surgeon, an emergency room specialist, and a family physician. He takes the reader on a quick tour of the human body, from head to toe.

He blends together anecdotes from his personal experience with literature, science, and history. This is not a comprehensive guide to human anatomy. Each chapter is but a cursory glance at some body part. But, as a result, the book is highly entertaining and engaging.

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Francis avoids excessive jargon, and brings his personal touch to each subje Gavin Francis is a surgeon, an emergency room specialist, and a family physician. Francis avoids excessive jargon, and brings his personal touch to each subject. The book is filled with surprising facts that would make for great party conversations. The liver is the only organ that can be regenerated, if part of it is lost. Francis also helped instill in me a deep respect for military doctors. They are under intense pressure, yet their experience has been very helpful to civilian doctors as well.

I also enjoyed the numerous links Francis drew to classical literature and folk tales. For example, the descriptions of injuries related in the Iliad are very accurate. As another example, he relates a serious infection a woman got from brush with a thorn bush with the tale of Sleeping Beauty. In addition, you will be entertained by beautiful writing and personal observations that show a deeply sensitive writer and doctor.

Nov 23, Jeanette rated it really liked it. Exceptional poetic, lyrical quotes too by past poets and philosophers included detailing of the human body. Human body systems are equated to geographic shapes and movements of wider nature through the treatments of their own special workings. Lovely, peaceful, respect of awe poise is rare and exquisite! I've never come across something this aesthetic "light" let alone anything with this literary approach for Exceptional poetic, lyrical quotes too by past poets and philosophers included detailing of the human body. I've never come across something this aesthetic "light" let alone anything with this literary approach for ANY scientific or medical information book, treatise, dissertation.

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Passages that would fit more easily into emotive poems flow with adoration for the form. And within each tale is a different patient whose illness or condition reflects a difficulty within the pertinent detailed system. The doctor's gentleness! Gentle as can be managed under such perimeters for pain, strife, fear, joy or encompassing acceptance for ordeal or future outcome. This might be appreciated more by those who have little medical detail memory, but maybe not.

It could be that those who work within these very spaces would love this one just as much. This author has lead the most unusual adventurer life. He's traveled with his work and also changed entire medical venues more than a few times. He is the living antithesis of the Hilary Mantel quip re his profession.

Very unusual person, quite beyond unusual doctor as his sensitivity is also literally acute. Very interesting read- and highly recommend. View all 5 comments. I reviewed this book on Amazon's UK site. It's worth noting that the book, and my review, refer to the UK's National Health Service the NHS , which makes many mistakes, but without it millions of lives in Britain would be seriously affected. For all its UK 'bias' Dr, Francis lives and practices in Scotland, it is a book that will cross all boundaries and cultures, and I urge you to read it.

Medicine men I never quite know what to make of those I meet. Last year, in the early hours of an April morning, I sat alone against the rear wall and watched a young doctor sympathetically settle my wife into a bed in the intensive care unit. The ward was quiet. Away to my left was a small peacock of a man in glittering waistcoat that looked cut from a priest's vestments. I thought he was wearing spats, but as he approached, head up, better to see down his nose, I saw they were two tone, like golf shoes.

The young doctor was telling the nurse what medication my wife needed when the peacock, still ten strides away, called out 'No! I later discovered that this peacock of a surgeon had told my sister to 'get yourself home and empty your bowels', when she presented with severe abdominal pain. Three days later he was cutting cancer from her bowel. Then, as my wife's condition deteriorated, I was introduced to another surgeon, a man of humility and humanity, a man who did not patronise as he answered me straight: 'What's the prognosis for my wife, please?

Gavin Francis's book not only taught me about the body, but it gave me back some sanity and balance in the judgement of others. The drama of saving lives, of making decisions, of being 'somebody', attracts the peacocks, but what a salve it is to find that it has an irresistible pull too for people like Gavin Francis. You will be in turns transfixed and enchanted by Dr Francis's gradual uncloaking of the human body, not least by his skill in portraying without 'big words'.

You'll learn not only about the bone and blood and meat of which we're made, but of how others, long dead, saw it - the Greeks, the Romans, the philosophers, and the great writers. And all of it as seamless as the body itself.

Adventures in Human Being : A Grand Tour from the Cranium to the Calcaneum - rolosegoco.ga

You are not jerked from place to place, but led smoothly along with the expertise of a born writer as well as a great doctor. You will watch with enchanted horror the rapid deterioration of a dark-haired young woman whose brush with a rose thorn brought her long lost mother to her intensive care bedside.

And while the mother waits with her taped-eyed, tubed and wired unconscious child, Gavin Francis links her story beautifully with that of Snow White and the beliefs of older days. John McEnroe's wife, the rock star, Patti Smith, finally discouraged him from trying to be a top guitarist by asking him, 'What are the chances of god giving you the talent to be the greatest tennis player in the world, and then adding some more to make you the greatest rock guitarist?

I suspect the main wish of anyone finishing this book will be that Dr Francis would add them to his list patients. I am off now to buy the other books of Gavin Francis. Happily, my wife will be able to read them too.

After three weeks of lying with nine tubes sewn into her neck feeding her all the nutrients her body needed, her pancreas survived well, all but the tail. That tail died. I suspect this tale, so wonderfully told by Gavin Francis, will outlive many of us. View all 7 comments. May 16, Barbara The Bibliophage rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction , own-digital , audio , , science-and-medicine.

More reviews at TheBibliophage. From stem to stern, tip to toes, Francis picks a vital part of anatomy and verbally dissects it. Each essay takes a particular topic related to a vital More reviews at TheBibliophage. As much philosophical as it is anatomical, Adventures in Human Being draws from various cultures and traditions as well. His approach is unique, and eminently readable. I listened to the audiobook, with excellent narration by Thomas Judd.

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I may even track down a print copy so as to have the ability to ponder elements of the essays in a different way. Highly recommend for science nerds and anyone with a body! A moment of silence for a work of not only literature, but also science. The way the two opposing elements of literature and science intertwined is noteworthy. The core of this book, which was a series of stories as Francis journeys the reader from cranium to calcaneum touched me heart and soul.

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